Academic Programs

Contact Information

Dean for Academic Programs: Mary Flores, MA
E-mail: mflores@lcsc.edu
Office: SPH 116B
Phone: 208-792-2325
FAX: 208-792-2763
Web: http://www.lcsc.edu/academic-programs/

Academic Programs includes the Office of the Academic Dean, the Library, Dual Credit, and the Divisions of Business, Education & Kinesiology, Humanities, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, Nursing & Health Sciences, and Social Sciences. Reporting to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Academic Dean, the Director of the Library, and the Academic Division Chairs work collaboratively, in partnership with faculty, to offer a wide range of high-quality degree programs to a diverse student body. Students who graduate with a degree from one of the academic divisions listed above will have completed a cohesive program of study that integrates General Education Core courses, Major program requirements, and Minor program requirements and/or elective credits. Whether a student completes an individualized General Studies or Interdisciplinary Studies degree, a degree in the Liberal Arts and Sciences, or a degree in a professional program, each graduate will have had opportunities to participate in on-campus and on-line classes, in seminars, research symposia, internships or service learning, second language study, clubs and activities, and other experiences designed to enrich his or her academic career.

General Education Requirements

General Education (also known as Core) classes are an essential part of study in any area at Lewis-Clark State College.  These courses provide universal skills and knowledge contributing to success in the major programs and in employment after graduation.  They also provide means for discovery of new interests and perspectives.  While the students’ majors provide in-depth understanding in one area, the General Education courses provide a broad understanding of the world in which students will live and work after graduation.

LCSC’s General Education (Core) courses conform to the Idaho State Board of Education’s credit and course requirements.  There are eight competency areas.  The first six are Idaho State Board of Education General Education Matriculation (GEM) requirements.  The last two are specific to Lewis-Clark State College.  The areas are:

  • Written Communication
  • Oral Communication
  • Mathematical Ways of Knowing
  • Scientific Ways of Knowing
  • Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing
  • Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing
  • Diversity
  • Interdisciplinary Capstone
     

For more detail about the Idaho State Board of Education competency areas, please see the Governing Policies and Procedures, Section III.N ‘Statewide General Education.’

The course options for each competency area are listed below:

General Education Core Requirements 2015-2016

Written Communication

English - 6 credits required
ENGL-101COLLEGE WRITING3.00
ENGL-102RESEARCH WRITING3.00
ENGL-109COLLEGE WRITING AND RESEARCH6.00

Oral Communication

Choose one:
COMM-101PRINCIPLES OF SPEECH3.00
COMM-202INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION3.00
COMM-203SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION3.00
COMM-204PUBLIC SPEAKING3.00

Mathematical Ways of Knowing

Choose one:
MATH-123MATHEMATICS AS A LIBERAL ART3.00
MATH-130FINITE MATHEMATICS4.00
MATH-147PRECALCULUS5.00
MATH-147APRECALCULUS ALGEBRA3.00
MATH-147BPRECALCULUS TRIGONOMETRY2.00
MATH-170CALCULUS I4.00
MATH-253STATISTICAL METHODS FOR THE SCIENCES3.00
MATH-257FOUNDATION OF ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS II3.00
MTHPT-130MATH FOR BUSINESS ANALYSIS4.00
MTHPT-137MATH FOR TECHNOLOGY4.00

 Humanistic & Artistic Ways of Knowing

English Literature - 3 credits required
ENGL-150INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE3.00
ENGL-257WORLD CLASSICS3.00
ENGL-258INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE3.00
ART/HUM/THEA - 3 credits required
ART-100SURVEY OF ART3.00
HUM-101THE ART AND HISTORY OF THE MOTION PICTURE3.00
HUM-150INTRODUCTION TO THE ARTS3.00
MUS-101SURVEY OF MUSIC3.00
MUS-102MUSIC IN AMERICA3.00
MUS-150WORLD MUSIC3.00
MUS-151HISTORY OF MUSICAL THEATER3.00
THEA-101SURVEY OF THE THEATER3.00

Scientific Ways of Knowing

Take one course from 2 disciplines. One must be a lab. 7-8 credits required.
BIOL-102SCIENCE FOR LIFE4.00
BIOL-120PLANTS AND PEOPLE4.00
BIOL-175HUMAN BIOLOGY4.00
BIOL-252HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I4.00
CHEM-102THE CHEMISTRY OF DAILY LIFE4.00
CHEM-105GENERAL, ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY4.00
CHEM-111PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I4.00
CS-108INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE4.00
FSCI-101INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE4.00
GEOL-100ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCE4.00
GEOL-120INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SYSTEMS4.00
GIS-271GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS4.00
NS-150INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL SCIENCES3.00
NS-174NATURAL SCIENCE FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATOR4.00
PHYS-111GENERAL PHYSICS I4.00
PHYS-171PHYS SCIENCES FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATORS4.00
PHYS-205DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY4.00
PHYS-211ENGINEERING PHYSICS I4.00

Social & Behavioral Ways of Knowing

Take one course from 2 disciplines. 6 credits required
ANTH-102CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3.00
ANTH-120WORLD PREHISTORY3.00
ANTH-170INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES3.00
ECON-201PRINCIPLES AND THEORY OF MACROECONOMICS3.00
ECON-202PRINCIPLES AND THEORY OF MICROECONOMICS3.00
GEOG-102INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY3.00
HIST-101HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION3.00
HIST-102HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION3.00
HIST-111UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 18653.00
HIST-112UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 18653.00
HRPT/SS-184DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS3.00
HRPT/SS-185HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS3.00
POLS-101AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT3.00
POLS-285COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT3.00
PSYC-101INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY3.00
PSYC-205DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY3.00
SOC-101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3.00
SOC-102CURRENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS3.00
SS-184DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS3.00
SS-185HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS3.00

Diversity

Take one Diversity course. Some courses may be listed in other core areas, but may only count once.
ANTH-102CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY3.00
ANTH-120WORLD PREHISTORY3.00
ANTH-170INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES3.00
ANTH-360RACE AND ETHNICITY3.00
COMM-345COMMUNICATION AND DIVERSITY3.00
ENGL-258INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE3.00
ENGL-474NATIVE AMERICAN WRITTEN LITERATURE3.00
GEOG-102INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY3.00
HIST-101HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION3.00
HIST-102HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION3.00
HIST-111UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 18653.00
HIST-112UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 18653.00
HRPT-184DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS3.00
ID-300CDIVERSITY3.00
NP-101ELEMENTARY NEZ PERCE LANGUAGE I4.00
NP-102ELEMENTARY NEZ PERCE LANGUAGE II4.00
POLS-285COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT3.00
SOC-101INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3.00
SS-184DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS3.00
SPAN-101ELEMENTARY SPANISH I4.00
SPAN-102ELEMENTARY SPANISH II4.00
SPAN-201INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I4.00
SPAN-202INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II4.00

Integrative Seminar: Ethics/Values

Take one Ethics/Values Course. 3 credits required. See course descriptions for specific titles.
ID-300AANIMALS AND SOCIETY3.00
ID-300BART AND CENSORSHIP3.00
ID-300CDIVERSITY3.00
ID-300DETHICS AND ECOLOGY3.00
ID-300EETHICS AND TECHNOLOGY3.00
ID-300FGENDER AND CULTURE3.00
ID-300GHEALTH INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR3.00
ID-300HLAW AND SOCIETY3.00
ID-300JTERRORISM CONTEMPORARY ERA3.00
ID-300KVALUES AND SPORTS3.00
ID-300LVIETNAM3.00
ID-300MVULNERABLE POPULATIONS3.00
ID-300NWILDERNESS3.00
ID-300PDISEASES AND SOCIETY3.00
ID-300QECONOMICS OF GOOD AND EVIL3.00
ID-300RLEADERSHIP AND ETHICS3.00
ID-300SNORTHWEST CULTURE/HISTORY/LITERATURE3.00
ID-300TPROPAGANDA3.00
ID-300UWOMEN IN THE 20TH CENTURY3.00
ID-301AHELLS CANYON INSTITUTE3.00

Bachelor's Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Studies major provides students with the opportunity to major in an interdisciplinary program that can be tailored to meet unique and specific career and graduate education opportunities. A student opting for this program works with an advisory committee to develop a coherent degree plan that includes two broadly-defined disciplinary Areas of Concentration leading to a focused educational objective.

Interdisciplinary Studies Degree Requirements

1. Completion of a Program Information Form (PIF) declaring a BA or BS in Interdisciplinary Studies with a Baccalaureate Degree Plan and Justification Statement attached. All documents must be signed by the Advisory Committee and submitted to the Dean of Academic Programs for final approval.

2. The Advisory Committee will consist of an advisor from each Area of Concentration and one Division Chair from one of the selected Areas of Concentration.

3. Students will include two broadly-defined disciplinary areas (Areas of Concentration) in their degree curriculum plan. While courses in a disciplinary area need not all come from a single disciplinary prefix (such as ENGL or PSYC), such courses should be closely related and the student will need to justify the grouping of courses in a single area in the Justification Statement.

4. The Justification Statement will detail the purpose of the Interdisciplinary Degree, the Learning Objectives, the rationale for the courses selected, and why an existing major will not achieve the same purpose.

5. Students must complete a minimum of 21 semester credits in each Area of Concentration, and 51 credits in both areas combined (not including the capstone course). At least 15 of the 21 credits in each Area of Concentration must be in upper division course work (300-400 level).

6. Students will complete the 3 credit capstone course, ID 450, Interdisciplinary Studies Seminar, as part of their program.

7. Changes to the originally approved degree curriculum plan must be approved by all members of the Advisory Committee.

8. Students graduate with a B.A. or B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies. The Areas of Concentration will not be indicated on the diploma, nor will they appear on the transcript.

9. Coursework used to fulfill the requirements for an Area of Concentration may not also be used to fulfill the majority of coursework required for a minor.

Dual Credit in Academic Programs

Lewis-Clark State College offers high school students the opportunity to simultaneously earn high school and college credit through Dual Credit course offerings.  Approved Academic Dual Credit courses are administered through the Academic Programs Dean’s office; curriculum and assessment are overseen by Academic Division Chairs and program faculty.  Dual Credit courses meet the same course outcomes as courses offered by the college and enable students to make early progress towards a postsecondary degree.  Dual Credit courses offered through Lewis-Clark State College Academic Programs comply with Idaho State Board of Education policy III.Y., Advanced Opportunities. 

Prior Learning Assessment

Students may earn college credit for specific college-level learning that they have achieved through life and work experiences.  Prior Learning Assessment opportunities range from standardized exams such as CLEP or DSST, credit recommendations from programs such as ACE, Challenge Exams, or the Portfolio Program.  For more information about Prior Learning Assessment, contact the LCSC Registrar’s office.  The Office of the Registrar is located in Reid Centennial Hall, Rm 108, and the number is (208) 792-2223, or registrar@lcsc.edu.