Social Sciences Division

Contact Information

Chair: Christopher K. Riggs, PhD
E-mail: ckriggs@lcsc.edu
Office: ADM 16A
Phone: 208-792-2291
FAX: 208-792-2571
Web: http://www.lcsc.edu/social-sciences

The Division offers seven baccalaureate majors and one associate degree. The baccalaureate majors are: General Studies, History, Interdisciplinary Studies, Justice Studies, Psychology, Social Work and Social Science with Secondary Certification and emphases in Political Science, Sociology, and Anthropology. The Associate of Arts degree is Behavioral Science.

All the majors in the Social Sciences Division provide preparation for a variety of careers, and/or graduate school. In addition, the Social Science major, when taken as part of an integrated secondary education program, prepares students for professional teaching. The Justice Studies major includes emphases in Criminal Justice and Corrections/Human Services. The Psychology major is for students who wish to pursue graduate study in the discipline, or those who seek careers in human services and community agencies. The Bachelor of Social Work program’s focus on the “Person-In-Environment” paradigm uniquely equips baccalaureate social workers to work effectively with individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations.

The Social Sciences Division lends vital support to the College through its participation in the General Education Core. All students are required to complete six Social Science credits as part of Core, and the Division provides a variety of courses for fulfilling this requirement.

The Social Sciences Division is committed to equal opportunity for all students. Policies and practices specifically prohibit discrimination based on, but not limited to, race, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, religion, disablement, national origin, marital status, and political belief.

Special Accreditation
Social Work is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Assessment

In order to obtain regular feedback on program excellence, the Division requires that all graduating seniors participate in a graduate assessment that includes:

  • Senior research project and presentation including a capstone experience with quantitative or qualitative research.
  • Area Concentration Achievement Tests (ACATs) for Justice Studies and Psychology graduating seniors.
  • Social Work Education Assessment Package (SWEAP) pre- and post-assessments for Social Work majors.
  • The graduate follow-up survey.

Expectations of Students

In the Justice Studies major:

  1. The ability to think critically about major issues relating to justice studies.
  2. An understanding of human behavior, social control, cultural differences, and concerns for minority groups with regard to criminal justice.
  3. Proficiency in the use of verbal and written communication skills.
  4. Basic competencies in conceptualizing, conducting, interpreting, and evaluating research in the field of criminal justice.
  5. An understanding of criminal and juvenile justice, criminology, law enforcement, adjudication, and corrections.
  6. First-hand experience in the theoretical and practical applications of justice studies.

In the Psychology major:

Students completing the Psychology major will be able to demonstrate skills and knowledge related to:

  1. A variety of research methodologies
  2. Biological bases of behavior
  3. Cognitive-affective bases of behavior
  4. Social bases of behavior
  5. Developmental theories
  6. Individual differences
  7. Preparation for graduate school or employment

Students who major in Psychology need to be aware that some elective psychology courses may require a discussion or disclosure of personal information, such as relationships with parents or significant others. This also includes courses students must take for the Addiction Studies minor.

In the Social Science major:

Students who graduate with a major in one of the Social Sciences emphasis areas should be able to do all of the following.

1.  Specialize in the content and theory of at least one of the Social Science disciplines (Anthropology, History, Political Science, and Sociology).

2.  Think critically about the history and development of social origins, social thought, and major societal periods and trends.

3.  Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of human perspectives and behavior.

4.  Develop strong professional communication skills.

5.  Demonstrate skills necessary to enter social science professions or graduate programs.

In the Social Work major:

  1. Provide learning experiences and opportunities in a variety of settings that develop generalist practice social work knowledge and skills needed to achieve BSW career objectives and meet client needs.
  2. Educate students on the ethical foundation of social work as stated in the NASW Code of Ethics where self reflection of one’s own values and the understanding of how they influence relationships is emphasized.
  3. Teach generalist practice social work knowledge and skills that prepare students to enhance human well-being and alleviate poverty, oppression, and other forms of social injustice through an understanding of social work history, social welfare policy analysis and development, advocacy, resource development, and other social or political actions that promote social and economic justice.
  4. Teach generalist practice social work knowledge and skills that prepare students to enhance the social functioning and interactions of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities by involving them in accomplishing goals, developing resources, and preventing and alleviating distress while relying on a liberal arts foundation.
  5. Engage and require students to develop, use, and critique research for evaluating practice and adding to the knowledge base of the profession.
  6. Ensure students have learned to develop and apply assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills differentially based on diversity with a strengths-based perspective from an ecological point of view.
  7. Encourage students to understand the ethical requirement of commitment to life long learning.

Special Fees

SW-497A - Liability malpractice insurance
PSYC-494 - Liability malpractice insurance

PSYC-495 -  - Liability malpractice insurance

Advising

Students must make appointments with their advisors, who will help them with course schedules, as well as planning their educational and post graduate careers. Only an advisor may approve the student’s schedule for Web registration.

Clubs

  • Gender-Sexuality Alliance
  • Psychology Club
  • Student Organization of Social Work
  • College Democrats
  • Anthropology Club
  • Active Minds
  • PoliSci
  • Justice Studies

Academic Honor Society

PSI CHI Honor Society of Psychology
Nu-Chi Chapter of Phi Alpha National Social Work Honors Society

Preparation for Future Graduate Studies

A degree in any of the Social Science majors provides an excellent foundation for future graduate studies.

ADS-243 INTRODUCTION TO ADDICTION STUDIES 3.00 Credits

An intensive survey and introductory course for those wanting to pursue a degree minor in the field of substance abuse counseling and addictionology. Basic information about Federal and State Funding streams, Federal agencies and their function and role in setting federal mandates for shaping policy and procedures that drive funding for the addictions field. An overview of historical and current trends in the "War on Drugs," the economy of keeping drug cultures alive, as well as the secret history of addictions will be explored. Specifically this course is designed to help the student determine direction and professional career planning in this ever-changing field of treatment and prevention. The goal is to allow the student to gain valuable information and then to determine career choices in the various settings where treatment and prevention services are administered. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101, or the permission of the instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 243.

ADS-244 INTRODUCTION SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION SERVICE 3.00 Credits

This is the introductory course to the prevention specialist course work required to become a Prevention Specialist in the state of Idaho. This course will explore the nature of prevention services from the community, school and individual viewpoint and how prevention services are best administered. Elements of this course will include gaining a historical perspective and overall basis for prevention services through the identification of community and school based needs. Additional attention will be paid to the extent and nature of drug use, abuse, addiction, treatment issues, and the impact that alcohol and drugs have on the individual, family, peers and community as a whole. Students will also become familiar with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) continuum of care and levels of prevention and the Center of Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) strategies and how to apply these strategies in prevention settings. Through the reading, in class assignments, lectures, writing projects and other educational tools the student will gain a general understanding of prevention services and how these services can be applied to youth in communities and schools in Idaho. Although the text and lectures are a main source for the course content, the student will also be required to respond to and interact with other sources of information such as research, relevant educational and training videos and possible guest lecturers. The student, as a result of this course, should have a thorough overview and understanding of the application of competent, ethical and culturally sensitive prevention services.

ADS-245 GROUP SKILLS SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION 3.00 Credits

This course will explore beginning group processes and group skills necessary for the prevention professional. Focus will include the learning and practicing of basic listening and helping skills and learning about group dynamics and processes, types of groups, and differences between various types of groups such as therapy, process and skill building groups. Additional information will center on assisting the beginning group facilitator to practice as a competent, ethical, cultural and gender sensitive facilitator. Specific content of the course will address theories of group process and dynamics, actual in class, hands-on practice of methods of group process and chances to participate and evaluate their group involvement. Through the reading, role playing, actual in class group participation as facilitator, in class assignments, lectures, writing projects and other educational tools the student will gain a general understanding of group work in substance abuse prevention services and how these services can be applied to youth in communities and schools in Idaho. Although the text and lectures are a minimal source for course content, the student will also be required to respond to and interact with other sources of information such as research, relevant educational and training videos and possible guest lectures. The student, as a result of this course, should have a basic knowledge and understanding of theories and skills needed to facilitate various groups in prevention settings as a competent, ethical and culturally sensitive group facilitator. This is a required course taken by students pursuing training as a Prevention Specialist or wishing to enhance their understanding and skill level in working with groups in the substance abuse prevention field. It is a course highly relevant to other majors and helping professions such as Education, Health, Social Work, Sociology, Kinesiology, Psychology, and Nursing, or anyone interested in improving general helping skills, group management techniques and basic knowledge, skills and attitudes related to running groups within the prevention field or other helping professions.

ADS-442 ETHICAL PRINCIPLES IN COUNSELING 3.00 Credits

Topics covered include federal and state laws, client welfare as a primary concern, professional competence-supervision/development, financial issues, personal wellness, and relationships to professionals and institutions. Development of students' ability to conceptualize ethical issues, utilize an appropriate model for resolution, and appreciate personal values and modes of ethical problem-solving are also considered. Fee required. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 442.

ADS-443 CASE MANAGEMENT AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY 3.00 Credits

The course focuses on practical application and administration of Case Management Services in health and human service delivery systems in Idaho. Case management studies emphasize clinical focus on case management services that apply to Rural and Frontier settings in Idaho. Students work with case management models where case management and records monitoring occur, from hospital, in-patient care to out patient settings in rural communities. Students are exposed to various treatment populations such as High Risk populations including AIDS/HIV populations, elderly, Native American, as well as gender specific issues. Students will be exposed to other disciplines such as Mental Health, Voc-Rehab. as well as Developmental Disability populations. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 443.

ADS-444 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND PHARMACOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Introduction to basic concepts of drug absorption, distribution and effect. It is intended to provide substance abuse counselors with a broad background in the understanding of drug effects and operations. Additionally, to allow the student to have a base of knowledge of pharmacology upon which instruction and education of clients can be facilitated. Fulfills the requirement for certification for both Idaho and Washington State Certification Boards. Includes concepts of basic neuroanatomy, concepts of drug absorption and drug elimination, anatomy of drug effects, and consequences of long term drug use. A comprehensive survey of entities and agencies that govern Controlled Substances and ODT issues. A global perspective on the physiology and pharmacology of different classes of drugs both those illegal and legal, abused and those used for treatment in institutions. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 205, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 444.

ADS-446 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND FAMILY SYSTEM 3.00 Credits

Includes behavioral patterns in dysfunctional family systems, intervention techniques and best practice model programs in dealing with family issues surrounding addiction problems. This course will expose the student to a plethora of various approaches to family systems and cultures that are diverse in nature. Students will create and experience sculpting, remodeling and replicating family roles and dysfunctional systems within a learning lab model. Students will study and become intimately acquainted with the roles of family dysfunction and dependency issues. Additionally, the student will review historical perspectives that help shape and steer the current modes of treatment for this underserved population within the addictions field. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 446.

ADS-447 TREATING CODEPENDENCY AND ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS 3.00 Credits

Identifies patterns of family dysfunction and the roots of codependency. Identifies the impact of chemical dependency, physical and sexual abuse, and parental rigidity on the development of the personality. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 447.

ADS-448 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND THE GROUP APPROACH 3.00 Credits

Identifies specific needs and treatment issues of the chemically dependent client. It is designed to provide both a cognitive and an experiential base from which the student can develop competency in treating this special population. Fulfills the requirements for certification as a chemical dependency counselor. Competency based education models for learning and integration of skills and techniques will be utilized. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 448.

ADS-449 ASSESMENT/SCREENING AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING 3.00 Credits

Reviews techniques for intake screening and assessment of chemical dependency clients. Appropriate for use in multiple settings. Field experience is included. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 449.

ADS-470 CRISIS INTERVENTION 3.00 Credits

Introduction and comprehensive overview of crisis intervention. Basic principles and theory of crisis intervention will be presented. Gives a foundation toward developing the skills to effectively deal with others in a crisis situation. Included are special populations/topics such as war veterans, rape, adult survivors, national disasters and other topics. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with PSYC 470.

ADS-495 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

Emphasizes the development of the basic helping skills and/or psychological research skills through a supervised field experience. Learning plans and goals will be defined to target students desiring a specific field experience in various settings utilizing addictions professionals and programs. Pre-requisites: Permission of the instructor and PSYC 442. Cross-listed with PSYC 495.

AERO-101 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF I 1.00 Credit

Introduces students to the Air Force and AFROTC. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC.

AERO-102 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF II 1.00 Credit

Introduces students to the Air Force and AFROTC. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC.

AERO-103 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY I 2.00 Credits

Students learn and apply leadership management, problem-solving, and communication skills; learn about and apply physical conditioning programs; and learn about Air Force organization, functions, customs/courtesy, and drill and ceremonies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets.

AERO-201 EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR/SPACE POWER I 1.00 Credit

Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC.

AERO-202 EVOLUTION OF USAF AIR/SPACE POWER II 1.00 Credit

Examines general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC.

AERO-203 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY II 2.00 Credits

Students learn and apply leadership management, problem-solving, and communication skills; learn about and apply physical conditioning programs; and learn about Air Force organization, functions, customs/courtesy, and drill and ceremonies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets.

AERO-281 FOUR-WEEK FIELD TRAINING COURSE 2.00 Credits

Pre-requisites: Junior standing; Aero Studies 101,102, 201, 202; by interview only. Intensive study of military education, experience in leadership and management at an active Air Force installation. S, F grading.

AERO-282 SIX-WEEK FIELD TRAINING COURSE 6.00 Credits

Pre-requisites: Junior standing; by interview only; applicants must apply at least six months in advance. Intensive study of academic core course work and military education at an active Air Force installation. S, F grading.

AERO-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN AEROSPACE STUDIES 1.00 Credit

AERO-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AEROSPACE 1.00-4.00 Credits

AERO-311 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP STUDIES I 3.00 Credits

Examines leadership, management, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, and leadership ethics. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC.

AERO-312 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP STUDIES II 3.00 Credits

Examines leadership, management, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, and leadership ethics. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC.

AERO-313 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY III 2.00 Credits

Students learn and apply leadership management, problem-solving, and communication skills; learn about and apply physical conditioning programs; and learn about Air Force organization, functions, customs/courtesy, drill and ceremonies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets.

AERO-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN AEROSPACE STUDIES 1.00-4.00 Credits

AERO-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AEROSPACE 1.00-4.00 Credits

AERO-411 NATL SECURITY AFFAIRS/PREP ACT DUTY I 3.00 Credits

Examines national security, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course.

AERO-412 NATL SECURITY AFFAIRS/PREP ACT DUTY II 3.00 Credits

Examines national security, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course.

AERO-413 LEADERSHIP LABORATORY IV 2.00 Credits

Students learn and apply leadership management, problem-solving, and communication skills; learn about and apply physical conditioning programs; and learn about Air Force organization, functions, customs/courtesy, and drill and ceremonies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets.

AERO-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN AEROSPACE STUDIES 1.00 Credit

AERO-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AEROSPACE 1.00-4.00 Credits

ANTH-101 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.00 Credits

The primary focus is on primate and hominid evolution, and the related development of culture. Other topics include introductions to paleontology, taxonomy, genetics, human population biology, and primate ethnology.

ANTH-102 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 3.00 Credits

A general introduction to the field of cultural anthropology. The course exposes students to an anthropological perspective on culture and humanity. Cross-cultural comparisons of language, ecology, economy, kinship/family, gender, social stratification, and change comprise the main topics. Theories of culture and methods of studying culture are briefly described.

ANTH-120 WORLD PREHISTORY 3.00 Credits

This course takes a world-historical approach in discussing the development of humanity and culture over the past 5 million years. Examples are drawn from all continents. Theories of human and cultural development are introduced.

ANTH-170 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES 3.00 Credits

Issues facing contemporary native people are studied in the context of basic information about American Indian people in the United States. The diversity of Native historical roots and current social settings are discussed. The approach is topical and selective, rather than comprehensive.

ANTH-192 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 3.00 Credits

ANTH-195 PRACTICUM IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

ANTH-205 GLOBAL ISSUES IN CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE 3.00 Credits

This course helps students to frame local issues in a global perspective by examining the relationship between globalization and cultural change. Globalization is the process of rapid technological, social, and cultural change. These changes have a profound affect on people's world view because they are intertwined with many local issues, such as health, environmental change, and violence.

ANTH-280 CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT 3.00 Credits

The adaptation of humans to their environment by means of cultural systems is analyzed. Issues such as human effects on the environment, environmental influences on humanity, change, and "sustainable development" are discussed.

ANTH-289 FIELD SCHOOL ARCHAEOLOGY 1.00-8.00 Credits

Diversity of human cultures; social organizations, subsistence patterns, economics, law, politics, religion, language and other institutions of culture explored through on-site field studies. Pre-requisite: Permission of the instructor. Students will be responsible for expenses associated with field school.

ANTH-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-291 WORKSHOP IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-295 PRACTICUM IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

ANTH-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

ANTH-310 CULTURE AND HEALTH 3.00 Credits

The linguistic and cultural dimensions of health and health care are examined through comparisons of traditional and 'Western' medical systems. Topics include world view, values, stress and development, and social organization.

ANTH-311 CULTURE AND EDUCATION 3.00 Credits

The sociocultural dimensions of learning/teaching are examined by contrasting educational experiences in different communities and cultural traditions. Topics include language, enculturation, socialization, schooling, and cultural hegemony. Pre-requisites: ANTH 102, SS 150, Post-Baccalaureate, or instructor permission.

ANTH-320 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3.00 Credits

The regional similarities and differences of native peoples are broadly described. Issues such as the impact of the Colombian exchange, conquest and accommodation, and sociocultural change affecting indigenous culture are discussed using ethnographic examples.

ANTH-360 RACE AND ETHNICITY 3.00 Credits

An introduction to the theoretical and substantive issues in the study of race and ethnicity. Students learn about the historical development of race and ethnicity as social categories and examine contemporary race and ethnic relations in the United States and other societies.

ANTH-365 COMPARATIVE RELIGION 3.00 Credits

The world's major religious traditions are outlined emphasizing the sociocultural context of doctrine, ritual, community, and the individual. Pre-requisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ANTH-368 SEX, EVOLUTION AND HUMAN NATURE 3.00 Credits

Human sexuality, male-female relations, cooperation, violence and parent-child relations examined cross0culturally and in nonhuman primates utilizing evolutionary and biocultural perspectives.

ANTH-386 ETHNOGRAPHY 3.00 Credits

In this course, students will be introduced to the qualitative and quantitative methods of Ethnography, the process of developing "natural histories" of daily community life, and will apply these methods by designing and conducting a limited ethnographic research project.

ANTH-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-391 WORKSHOP IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-395 PRACTICUM IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

ANTH-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

ANTH-450 ETHNOGRAPHY OF A SELECTED AREA 3.00 Credits

A cultural, social, and linguistic overview of a world region (e.g., Africa, South America, India) selected by the instructor. The region's major cultural patterns and variations will be outlined through particular cultures. Pre-requisite: ANTH 102.

ANTH-489 FIELD SCHOOL ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-8.00 Credits

Diversity of human cultures; social organizations, subsistence patterns, economics, law, politics, religion, language and other institutions of culture explored through on-site field studies. Pre-requisite: Permission of the instructor. Students will be responsible for expenses associated with field school.

ANTH-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-491 WORKSHOP IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

ANTH-494 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

HIST-101 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION 3.00 Credits

Surveys the development of society from Paleolithic era to the Reformation. Focuses on several facets of selected cultures, such as the evolution of civilizations, religion and philosophy, rhetorical tradition, and the unfolding of world commerce.

HIST-102 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION 3.00 Credits

Advent of the political and economic revolutions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Consequences of war, extension of economic, political, and social relationships beyond national borders. Identifies and expounds four themes: Development of Western World; Emergence of World System; Revolution and Ideology: War and Peace in the Twentieth Century.

HIST-111 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1865 3.00 Credits

A survey of U.S. political, diplomatic, economic, social, and cultural history through the end of the Civil War. The class is designed to illustrate that the past is distinct from the present (the "past is a foreign country") yet provides a context for understanding our own time.

HIST-112 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1865 3.00 Credits

A survey of U.S. political, diplomatic, economic, social, and cultural history from 1865 to the present. The class is designed to illustrate that the past is distinct from the present (the "past is a foreign country") yet provides a context for understanding our own time.

HIST-115 TRANSNATIONAL AMERICAN HISTORY 6.00 Credits

This six-credit course combines the material from the two U.S. histroy surveys (HIST 111 and HIST 112) as well as elements of the second half of the World history survey (HIST 102) into a single course and examines that history in a "transnational" fashion. That is, it looks at American history in a global context. In some cases, that means events in America at certain times paralleled events in other places. In other instances, the course will look at how events in American history were shaped by broader international developments and vice versa. Pre-requisite: Sophomore status or higher; or permission of instructor.

HIST-190 DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-200 KEYS TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH 3.00 Credits

Historiography is the history of history. This course centers on concepts and methods of history and those individuals who most contributed to historical thought. The role of the historian will be studied through the lives and methods of some of the foremost in the field.

HIST-240 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY 3.00 Credits

An examination of Native Americans' distinctive histories, cultures, and relations with non-Indian peoples and states. The course will include discussion of how the Native American past continues to influence Native and non-Native people in the present.

HIST-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-291 WORKSHOP IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-295 PRACTICUM IN HISTORY 1.00-12.00 Credits

HIST-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

HIST-300 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY HISTORY 3.00 Credits

An overview of Public History that analyzes the applied use of history in areas such as archives, consulting, museum studies, government agencies, litigation support, and historic preservation. Through projects, readings in professional journals, field trips, and guest speakers, students learn about various aspects of Public History. The course will also emphasize the many career opportunities for historians outside of teaching. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109 and completion of Social Science Core, or permission of instructor.

HIST-301 PROJECTS IN PUBLIC HISTORY 3.00 Credits

This course will focus on a specific sub-field in Public History (Cultural Resource Management, archival management, museum studies, historic preservation, and consulting work). Students will receive hands-on experience in a selected sub-field working on a historical project, providing both practice, theory, and experiential learning for students. This class is a methodology course that culminates in a final Public History project. Pre-requisite: HIST 300 or permission from the instructor.

HIST-333 AFRICA AND THE WORLD 3.00 Credits

A survey from pre-history to modern times through historical sources, literature, film and music. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-336 IMPERIALISM AND THE MODERN WORLD 3.00 Credits

Focuses on imperialism at the global level since 1492, with particular focus on the period since 1800. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-340 HISTORY OF THE NEZ PERCE TRIBE 3.00 Credits

An examination of the unique history of this tribe from prehistory to modern times. This will include a cultural-historical approach to the Nez Perce-White relations emphasizing the missionary period, the 1855 Treaty, tribal divisions and White encroachments. The Nez Perce War will be studied and post-war history including the Oklahoma exile, reservation allotment (1895) and modern developments, including fishing, hunting, health and gambling issues. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-360 HISTORY OF MOTION PICTURES 3.00 Credits

Examines the history and development of the motion picture art. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-370 HISTORY OF ASIA 3.00 Credits

A study of political and cultural developments in China, Japan, India and other Asian countries. Recent trends and relations with the West will be emphasized. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-391 WORKSHOP IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-395 PRACTICUM IN HISTORY 1.00-12.00 Credits

HIST-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

HIST-410 HISTORY OF UNITED STATES INDIAN POLICY 3.00 Credits

This course will examine United States government policies affecting American Indians from the 18th century to recent times. Attention will be paid to the creation, implementation, and impact of government actions, as well as to the ways Native Americans have influenced policy. Pre-requisite: HIST 111 or HIST 112; and ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-423 HISTORY OF IDAHO AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST 3.00 Credits

An examination of the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the areas now known as Idaho and the Pacific Northwest in a state, regional, and national context. Particular emphasis will be given to the life experiences of ordinary men and women of varied ethnic backgrounds and to the question of how the region's past has shaped the present day nature of the Pacific Northwest. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-424 AMERICAN WOMEN'S HISTORY 3.00 Credits

This course focuses on women's lives in American history, examining the social, political, cultural, and economic history of women. Considers how the history of America looks different through women's eyes, how women of all races and classes experienced events (both locally and nationally), and how women's lives changed over time. Pre-requisite: HIST 111 or HIST 112; and ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-425 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN WEST 3.00 Credits

An examination of the history of the Trans-Mississippi American West, including social, cultural, political, and economic developments from earliest times to the present. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of the instructor.

HIST-426 WOMEN IN THE WEST 3.00 Credits

This course explores the many different histories of women in the West, through their own words, through literature, through film, and through recent scholarship by western women's historians. The course will examine how the history of the American West looks different through women's eyes, considering whether women of all races and classes experienced greater "freedom" or opportunity in the West as opposed to women back east. Finally, the course will also examine how researching women's roles and experiences in the West changes the larger historical narrative of what is typically considered within the West. Pre-requisites: HIST 111 or HIST 112; and ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of the Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-429 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 3.00 Credits

The class examines the origins and development of major foreign policies within the context of international linkages, diplomatic organizations, and diplomatic procedures. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with POLS 429.

HIST-430 THE US AND PACIFIC RIM AFFAIRS 3.00 Credits

A detailed examination of new and continuing issues facing the United States as it has dealt with the peoples and nations of the Pacific Rim. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-444 HISTORY BEHIND THE NEWS 3.00 Credits

Students in this research-oriented course examine the historical context surrounding current events and the political economy of global media systems. Lectures and class discussions in the first half of the semester prepare students for conducting independent research projects during the second half of the semester. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-446 HISTORY OF AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE SINCE 1930 3.00 Credits

An examination of how popular culture both reflects larger trends in society as well as how it shaped U.S. history since 1930. This course uses popular culture as a lens through which to view larger society and culture by examining how popular culture mirrored larger themes and events, and influenced the nation's responses. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-448 HISTORY OF EARLY AMERICA 3.00 Credits

Examines the history of North America from pre-contact through the American Revolution. Specific areas of interest will be the cultural exchanges between different groups and nations; the impact of European empires on North America; the development of colonial culture; and the roads to revolution within the British colonies. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-450 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 3.00 Credits

This course will examine the causes and consequences of the American Civil War, paying attention to slavery, sectional differences (political, cultural, social, and economic), the course of the war, ideas of freedom and citizenship, and the political and social challenges and conflicts during Reconstruction. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science core, or permission of instructor.

HIST-451 GILDED AGE AMERICA, 1877-1900 3.00 Credits

The Gilded Age is a period in American history from roughly the 1870s to the early 1900s. This course will explore the major trends of this era including unprecedented economic and industrial growth, the rise of imperialism, urban expansion, political and corporate corruption, race relations, and conflict with labor. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission from the instructor.

HIST-454 HISTORY OF EUROPE (1815-1914) 3.00 Credits

A detailed study of major European countries from the Congress of Vienna to the First World War. Pre-reqisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-456 HISTORY OF EUROPE (1914 TO PRESENT) 3.00 Credits

A detailed study of major European countries and events from World War I to the present. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor. May 25 2010 04:28pm SHARON K. AUER.

HIST-460 RUSSIAN HISTORY 3.00 Credits

A history of the major political, cultural, social and intellectual developments in Russia from the earliest times to the present. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-465 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY 3.00 Credits

A study of Latin American from Napoleonic wars to Castro's Cuba. Economic, political and social issues are described. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

HIST-473 MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY 3.00 Credits

This course examines the social, political, intellectual, and economic development of the Middle East from the Ottoman empire of the nineteenth century to the present. The course will discuss how the region has been impacted by nationalism and imperialism and explore the events that have shaped the Middle East over the last century. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission from the instructor.

HIST-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-491 WORKSHOP IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY 1.00-3.00 Credits

HIST-494 INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY 1.00-6.00 Credits

HIST-495 PRACTICUM IN HISTORY 1.00-12.00 Credits

HIST-499 RESEARCH PROJECT AND SEMINAR IN HISTORY 1.00-12.00 Credits

A senior seminar that investigates historiography. Pre-requisites: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109; and completion of Social Science Core; or permission of instructor.

JS-103 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3.00 Credits

An account of the purpose, function, and history of the agencies dealing with the administration of justice, providing a survey of criminal law, criminal procedures, organizations and law enforcement agencies, courts, and corrections.

JS-190 DIRECTED STUDY IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-12.00 Credits

JS-193 SERVICE LEARNING 12.00 Credits

JS-201 POLICE IN AMERICA 3.00 Credits

This course reflects the commitment to the ideal of a professional police force in a free society. That means the police should be responsive to the needs of the public, as indicated through an open political process, and responsive to the rule of law. These ideals will be conveyed to the student by a focus on major contemporary issues affecting our societal order.

JS-202 CORRECTIONS IN AMERICA 3.00 Credits

A survey of the historical, philosophical, and legal bases of correctional procedures and institutions and an examination of current problems and innovations.

JS-225 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE 3.00 Credits

An examination of the procedural aspects of criminal law. Specific applications of procedures by actors in the criminal justice process including police, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and corrections officials. This examination will provide a basic understanding of state and local legal codes, as well as current applications of law in both arrest and search and seizure.

JS-275 PRINCIPLES OF INTERVIEWING AND CASE STUDIES 3.00 Credits

The application of behavioral theory in interviewing and case study analysis is shown in this course by examining interpersonal behavior, symbolic interaction, nonverbal behavior, and levels of communication involved in the interviewing process.

JS-280 PRINCIPLES OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS 3.00 Credits

The principles guiding criminal investigation, such as deductive/inductive reasoning, managing criminal investigations, preliminary investigation at the crime scene, and specific duties and identification techniques, are outlined.

JS-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-12.00 Credits

Written permission must be secured from the supervising instructor and the Chairperson of the Social Sciences Division prior to enrollment. May be repeated.

JS-291 WORKSHOP IN JUSTICE STUDIES 3.00 Credits

JS-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-3.00 Credits

JS-295 PRACTICUM IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-12.00 Credits

Criminal Justice majors obtain field experience supervised by officials of law enforcement, court, and/or corrections agencies.

JS-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

JS-302 PROBATION AND PAROLE 3.00 Credits

This course provides an overview of community based corrections, focusing primarily on the probation and parole process. Topics addressed include the historical and theoretical foundations of probation and parole, pre-sentence investigations, sentencing, and managing/reducing risk in the community.

JS-310 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 3.00 Credits

Students study behavior in the justice system as influenced by organizational structure, technology, managerial policies, supervisory patterns, individual need, and group relations. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or instructor's permission.

JS-320 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3.00 Credits

The theories of causation, prevention, control, and treatment of delinquency in contemporary society are studied. Included in this survey are modes of treatment, methods of diverting youth-related problems from the juvenile courts to other community resources, and post-treatment adjustment. Cross-listed with SOC 320.

JS-325 CRIMINAL LAW 3.00 Credits

A course dealing with the substantive law of crimes which examines the rights and duties of persons to each other and to society in general. It emphasizes historical development, criminal responsibility, and defenses. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or instructor's permission.

JS-333 WHITE COLLAR CRIME 3.00 Credits

This course will study the costs, causes and control of crime by and against businesses and other organizations; the relationship between trust and white collar crime; and the impact of the media in shaping perceptions of white collar crime. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or permission of instructor.

JS-345 CRIMINOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Students study crime and society, theories of criminality, types and trends of crime, characteristics of criminals, social control, and criminological controversies. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or instructor permission. Cross-listed with SOC 345.

JS-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-12.00 Credits

JS-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-3.00 Credits

JS-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-3.00 Credits

This course is an opportunity for students to conduct applied research for criminal justice agencies. Pre-requisite: Lower core complete and permission of instructor.

JS-401 COMMUNITY POLICING 3.00 Credits

This course is an examination of the philosophy, tactics, problems and solutions encountered when the community and police engage in the teamwork of community policing. The course contains a service-learning component that combines community service with structured learning and reflection, connecting the needs of the community with coursework and our roles as citizens. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or permission of instructor.

JS-402 REHABILITATION PROGRAMS 3.00 Credits

This course examines the programs designed to reduce the likelihood that released prisoners will re-offend. Programs that aim to change criminal thinking, education, job training, and substance abuse programs will be studied. Program evaluation strategies will be explored. The course will include a field trip to a correctional facility in the area.

JS-403 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS 3.00 Credits

The functions, institutions, and operations of US and foreign criminal justice systems are compared. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or permission of instructor.

JS-422 RACE, CLASS, GENDER & JUSTICE 3.00 Credits

This course explores the effects of race, class and gender on the criminal justice system. Patterns of offending and victimization associated with the categories of race, class and gender will be studied. Students will study topics such as profiling, disparities in sentencing and the death penalty, minority overrepresentation in prison, responses to battering, and criminal justice system employment practices. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or SOC 101 or instructor permission. Cross-listed with SOC 422.

JS-423 JUSTICE ISSUES AND PUBLIC POLICY 3.00 Credits

Students study and discuss major issues, professional ethics, and policy analysis. Pre-requisite: Senior Justice Studies majors or instructor's permission.

JS-425 VIOLENCE TOWARD WOMEN 3.00 Credits

This course will provide an overview of violence directed toward women. Crimes such as domestic violence, stalking, rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment will be analyzed within a broader social context. Special attention will be given to how these crimes affect women and men, and how societal institutions (e.g., the criminal justice system, the health care system, employers, and social service providers) may better address the needs of victims and offenders. The course will be based on information gathered through current research, guest lectures, and scholarly and media resources. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101 & ENGL 102. Cross-listed with SOC 425.

JS-475 CRIME, JUSTICE AND ETHICS 3.00 Credits

This course addresses the ethical implications of decision-making and policy development in the criminal justice field, including the police, court, and corrections systems. Prerequisite: JS 103 and Junior or Senior standing; or permission of instructor.

JS-484 CYBERCRIME 3.00 Credits

This online course will examine the history, typologies, trends, and causes associated with computer crimes such as hacking, virus writing and cyberterrorism. The course will also address the legislation and law enforcement practices designed to prevent, investigate and prosecute computer crimes. Pre-requisiste: JS 103 or permission of instructor.

JS-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-12.00 Credits

Written permission must be secured from the supervising instructor and the Chairperson of the Social Sciences Division prior to enrollment. May be repeated.

JS-491 WORKSHOP IN JUSTICE STUDIES 3.00 Credits

JS-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-3.00 Credits

JS-495 PRACTICUM IN JUSTICE STUDIES 1.00-12.00 Credits

Justice Studies majors obtain field experience supervised by officials of law enforcement, court, and/or corrections agencies.

JS-499 RESEARCH PROJECT AND SEMINAR IN JUSTICE STUDIES 3.00 Credits

Graded P/F only.

MS-101 INTRO TO ARMY AND CRITICAL THINKING 1.00 Credit

Introduction to mission and organization of the US Army; provides background in role of an Army officer as a career choice in either the Active Army or the National Guard/Reserves; lecture, conference, and activities dealing with military subjects; participate in outdoor activities such as whitewater rafting, mountaineering, rifle marksmanship, and rappelling; texts and lab fees provided by dept; no mandatory uniform wear; students learn about available scholarships and other financial programs. Co-requisite: MS 111. Participation entails no military obligation.

MS-102 INTRO TO THE PROFESSION OF ARMS 1.00 Credit

Continuation of MS 101. Development of greater understanding of roles and responsibilities of Army officers; lecture, conference, and activities dealing with military subjects; participation in challenging outdoor activities such as orienteering, mountaineering, and weapons qualification; occasional uniform wear required; texts, uniforms, and lab fees provided by dept; more focus on leadership development and the development of personal confidence. Co-requisite: MS 112. Participation entails no military obligation.

MS-111 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 101 and 102.

MS-112 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 101 and 102.

MS-152 PHYSICAL FITNESS TRAINING 1.00 Credit

Physical fitness training focused on Army Standards for instruction and testing. Open to all UI students. (Spring only).

MS-201 APPLIED LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT 2.00 Credits

Application of leadership and management skills to various case studies; organization and structure of Army units; basic first aid; practical field training in variety of outdoor skills (mountaineering, rafting, rifle marksmanship); uniform wear required; texts, uniforms, and lab fees provided by dept. Pre-requisite: MS 102 or permission of department. Co-requisite: MS 211. Participation entails no military obligation.

MS-202 FOUNDATIONS OF LEADERSHIP II 2.00 Credits

Troop leading procedures and application of procedures to planning and conducting small unit operations; individual soldier skills, such as military communication, basic map reading, and survival skills; practical field training in variety of outdoor skills (mountaineering, rafting, rifle marksmanship); uniform wear required; texts, uniforms, and lab fees provided by dept. Pre-requisite: MS 201 or permission of department. Co-requisite: MS 212. Participation entails no military obligation.

MS-211 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 201 and MS 202.

MS-212 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 201 and 202.

MS-227 AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY 3.00 Credits

Using lecture and small group discussions, this is a survey of the American military experience. Events are analyzed using the conventional discipline of historical methodology and the classical norms of the principles of warfare. Fulfills military history requirement for commissioning of cadets. Department permission required.

MS-252 PHYSICAL FITNESS TRAINING 1.00 Credit

Physical fitness training focused on Army Standards for instruction and testing. Open to all UI students. (Spring only).

MS-280 RAIDER CHALLENGE 1.00-4.00 Credits

The Chrisman Raider Team is an elite group of individuals who compete on intercollegiate level in military skills of marksmanship, physical fitness, navigation, weapons, rope bridging, and long distance marching; rigorous physical training and practicing technical skills in preparation for two-day competition among schools throughout Western US. Co-requisite: MS 101 or 102 or 201 or 202 or 301 or 302 or 401 or 402.

MS-281 MILITARY PROFICIENCY CHALLENGE 1.00-4.00 Credits

This course prepares cadets to take the two-day German Armed Forces Proficiency Badge test, which consists of track and field events, marksmanship, road march, swim test, and first aid course. Department permission required. (Spring only) Co-requisite: MS 111, MS 112, MS 211, MS 212, MS 311, MS 312, MS 411, or MS 412.

MS-288 COLOR GUARD/DRILL TEAM 1.00-4.00 Credits

Participation and training in color guard and drill team. Co-requisite: MS 101 or 102 or 201 or 202 or 301 or 302 or 401 or 402.

MS-289 BASIC ENCAMPMENT 6.00 Credits

Intensive five-week summer encampment at Fort Knox, Kentucky; hands-on training in fundamentals of leadership in a military environment, land navigation, weapons training, drill and ceremony, and basic skills in doctrinal tactics employed by light infantry leaders. Pre-requisites: 50 cr hrs, 2.0 GPA, and permission of department head.

MS-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-291 WORKSHOP IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

Pre-requisite: By permission.

MS-295 PRACTICUM IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-301 ADAPTIVE TEAM LEADERSHIP 3.00 Credits

Practical leadership skills in a light infantry environment; leadership techniques practiced while learning patrolling and offensive and defensive tactics at squad and platoon level; prepares cadets for five-week Advanced Camp at Fort Lewis, Washington. Three hours of lecture, 2 hours of lab, and 3 hours of physical training a week, plus field training exercises. Pre-requisites: Either ROTC Basic Course, Camp Challenge, or Basic Training from any US military branch of service. Co-requisites: MS 311 and MS 312.

MS-302 APPLIED TEAM LEADERSHIP 3.00 Credits

Practical leadership skills in a light infantry environment; leadership techniques practiced while learning patrolling and offensive and defensive tactics at squad and platoon level; prepares cadets for five-week Advanced Camp at Fort Lewis, Washington. Three hours of lecture, 2 hours of lab, and 3 hours of physical training a week, plus field training exercises. Pre-requisites: Either ROTC Basic Course, Camp Challenge, or Basic Training from any US military branch of service. Co-requisites: MS 311 and MS 312.

MS-311 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 301 and 302.

MS-312 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 301 and 302.

MS-352 PHYSICAL FITNESS TRAINING 1.00 Credit

Physical fitness training focused on Army Standards for instruction and testing. Open to all UI students. (Spring only).

MS-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-401 MISSION COMMAND AND ARMY PROFESSION 3.00 Credits

Practical application of leadership and management skills, military justice system, administrative and logistical procedures; preparation for service as an Army lieutenant. Pre-requisites: MS 301 and 302. Co-requisites: MS 411 and 412, 471 and 472.

MS-402 MISSION COMMAND AND COMP GRADE OFFICER 3.00 Credits

Practical application of leadership and management skills, military justice system, administrative and logistical procedures; preparation for service as an Army lieutenant. Pre-requisites: MS 301 and 302. Co-requisites: MS 411 and 412, 471 and 472.

MS-411 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 401 and 402.

MS-412 LEADERSHIP LAB 1.00 Credit

Building fundamental characteristics of leadership using a military model; hands-on training in small group leadership. Two hours of lab every other week. Co-requisites: MS 401 and 402.

MS-452 PHYSICAL FITNESS TRAINING 1.00 Credit

Physical fitness training focused on Army Standards for instruction and testing. Open to all UI students. (Spring only).

MS-471 COMMAND AND STAFF FUNCTIONS 2.00 Credits

Hands-on practical applications of functions of US Army officers assigned to command and staff positions; planning, coordinating, and implementing operations, training and logistic support for cadet battalion activities; practical exercises in interrelationships between commander, staff, higher headquarters, and subordinate units. Co-requisites: MS 401 and 402.

MS-472 COMMAND AND STAFF FUNCTIONS 2.00 Credits

Hands-on practical applications of functions of US Army officers assigned to command and staff positions; planning, coordinating, and implementing operations, training and logistic support for cadet battalion activities; practical exercises in interrelationships between commander, staff, higher headquarters, and subordinate units. Co-requisites: MS 401 and 402.

MS-489 ADVANCED ENCAMPMENT 1.00-12.00 Credits

Intensive five-week summer encampment at Fort Lewis, Washington. Graded P/F. Pre-requisites: MS 301 and 302 and permission of department.

MS-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-491 WORKSHOP IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-494 INTERNSHIP IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

MS-495 PRACTICUM IN MILITARY SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

POLS-100 INTRO TO POLITICAL SCIENCE & GOVERNMENT 3.00 Credits

Theories and concepts appropriate to understanding how human conflict arises and is resolved are surveyed. Problems in American, foreign and international politics provide the focus of study.

POLS-101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.00 Credits

Students are introduced to the general problems of government. The emphasis is on the basic concepts of American politics and the major structural and Constitutional elements of national government.

POLS-102 AMERICAN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3.00 Credits

This course is an introductory survey of the administration, politics, and organization of government at the sub-national level, including city, county, special district, and state governments. A brief introduction to the basics of the policy-making process is provided. Writing integrated.

POLS-200 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 3.00 Credits

Students learn to engage in a philosophical investigation of the justifications of political systems forwarded by ancient and modern political thinkers. Writing integrated. Cross-listed with PHIL 200.

POLS-237 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS 3.00 Credits

An overview of the world political system and a framework for analysis of the actions and actors in the global arena is provided.

POLS-285 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 3.00 Credits

An introduction to the study of politics through the comparison of selected foreign governments. The significance of contrasts in the role of culture, constitutions, interest groups, parties, participation, and political institutions in the formation of policy are discussed and analyzed.

POLS-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-291 WORKSHOP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-294 INTERSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-295 PRACTICUM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

POLS-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

POLS-300 INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY 3.00 Credits

An overview of the international economic system and the relationship of the global economy to world politics - the current economic order is emphasized. Students should take an appropriate economics course. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109, or permission of instructor.

POLS-332 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA 3.00 Credits

Students will examine contemporary political processes and their historical roots in Latin American states, including government structures, regime change, parties and elections, social movements, the effects of imperialism and colonialism and local political economy.

POLS-340 SOCIAL POLICY 3.00 Credits

This course explores the development, formulation, implementation and effects of social policy on institutions and society. Social policy formation, decision-making, analysis, and their intentional and unintentional effects on society are examined through the utilization of both historic and scientific public policy critical thinking analysis. Issues of identifying, evaluating, and reporting those effects are presented and discussed. A preview of present and future public policy trends will be introduced and critically analyzed.

POLS-345 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 3.00 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical development of the Constitution and the problems encountered under this type of system.

POLS-370 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION 3.00 Credits

This course deals with communication as the essence of the political process. By examining such topics as political campaigning, the press-government relationship, and the rhetoric of political leaders, the implications of political communication are addressed from the perspectives of politicians, the press, and the public. Cross-listed with COMM 370.

POLS-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-392 SPECIAL TOPIC IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 3.00 Credits

POLS-394 INTERSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 3.00 Credits

POLS-429 ORIGINS OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 3.00 Credits

The class examines the origins and development of major foreign policies within the context of international linkages, diplomatic organizations, and diplomatic procedures. Also listed as HIST 429.

POLS-463 WOMEN & POLITICS 3.00 Credits

Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the complexity surrounding women and politics through comparative and international perspectives, centering on how policy affects women, women affect policy and women as political leaders. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109, or permission of instructor.

POLS-464 POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

In this course students will examine patterns of political behavior, including leadership, group behavior, voting, race, ethnicity, nationalism, political extremism, terrorism, war and genocide. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109, or permission of instructor.

POLS-465 GLOBALIZATION & THE STATE 3.00 Credits

Through this course students will gain an understanding of the political, social, economic, technological and environmental aspects of globalization, the implications on the conception and power of the state and the role of the United States as the leader in globalization. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENLG 109, or permission of instructor.

POLS-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-491 WORKSHOP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

POLS-494 INTERNSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

POLS-495 PRACTICUM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

POLS-499 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-3.00 Credits

PSYC-101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

This general survey of psychology typically explores research methodology, bio-psychology, human development, memory, consciousness, motivation, emotions, personality, mental disorders, therapy, health psychology, social psychology, etc.

PSYC-190 DIRECTED STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-9.00 Credits

PSYC-199 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 12.00 Credits

PSYC-205 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Helps students gain an understanding of the physical, intellectual, emotional, social and moral development of children and adolescents from a multicultural perspective. Basic theories of child and adolescent development will be addressed to assist the student to learn to set the conditions for human development.

PSYC-226 BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR 3.00 Credits

Introduces students to a field of neuroscience that is variously referred to as physiological psychology, biopsychology, behavioral biology, or behavioral neuroscience. The main focus is on gaining and/or demonstrating an understanding of relationships between central nervous system processes and human behavior. Cross-listed with SW 226. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101; and ENGL 102 or ENGL 109.

PSYC-240 HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 3.00 Credits

An examination of issues surrounding the aims, methods, and structure of psychology with attention to (1) the nature of explanation and various philosophical approaches for the discipline, (2) professional and ethical considerations for the psychological practitioner, researcher, and writer, and (3) a survey of historical and contemporary issues in the field. The course aims to assist students to acquire a professional orientation to the discipline of psychology by gaining knowledge about a variety of issues, synthesizing and evaluating this knowledge, and applying it toward development and communication of informed positions and opinions relevant to these issues. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC-243 INTRODUCTION TO ADDICTION STUDIES 3.00 Credits

An intensive survey and introductory course for those wanting to pursue a degree minor in the field of substance abuse counseling and addictionology. Basic information about Federal and State Funding streams, Federal agencies and their function and role in setting Federal mandates for shaping policy and procedures that drive funding for the addictions field. An overview of historical and current trends in the "War on Drugs," the economy of keeping drug cultures alive, as well as the secret history of addictions will be explored. Specifically this course is designed to help the student determine direction and professional career planning in this ever-changing field of treatment and prevention. The goal is to allow the student to gain valuable information and then to determine career choices in the various settings where treatment and prevention services are administered. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101, or the permission of the instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 243.

PSYC-250 GROUP DYNAMICS 3.00 Credits

Provides the theory and practice necessary to develop effective group skills. An experiential approach to learning about group behavior will be used. The student will practice skills in the following behaviors: leadership, decision making, goal setting, interpersonal communication, problem solving, dealing with conflict and controversy, and effective use of power and influence. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

PSYC-291 WORKSHOP IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

PSYC-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

PSYC-295 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

Emphasizes the development of the basic helping skills and/or psychological research skills through a supervised field experience. Learning plans and goals will be defined to target students desiring a specific field experience in various settings utilizing addictions professionals and programs. Pre-requisites: Permission of the instructor and PSYC 442.

PSYC-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

Requires students to assist faculty in the conduct of research projects and other creative professional activities within the field of psychology. Students are expected to meet on a regular basis with the faculty member and to perform activities needed to bring the research or creative activity to a successful completion. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC-300 STATISTICAL METHODS 3.00 Credits

Survey of descriptive and inferential statistical concepts commonly used in the treatment of data in social science research. The understanding and application of the concepts will be emphasized. Topics covered will include: measures of central tendency, measures of variability, correlation methods, hypothesis testing and simple analysis of variance. Pre-requisite: Core Math. Cross-listed with ECON 300, SS 300.

PSYC-305 ADULT DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Traces ongoing human physical, cognitive and psychosocial development from early adulthood through the late years from a multicultural perspective. Recommended pre-requisite: PSYC 205.

PSYC-310 PERSONALITY THEORIES 3.00 Credits

Survey of the major theories of personality and personality development. Psychoanalytic, phenomenological, trait, behavioral and social learning views of personality will be presented along with the relevant research that evaluates the assumptions and implications of each approach. Special issues involving multiculturalism, points of controversy, and personality processes that are the focus of extended debate and research by personality psychologists will also be studied. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-311 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Study of the conceptualization and treatment of psychological difficulties including: anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. Issues related to multiculturalism and gender, and issues of controversy are also explored. Recommended pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-318 ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING 3.00 Credits

An introduction to the theory of assessment. Presents the foundational concepts, principles, and procedures needed to systematically acquire, organize, and apply information about learners and learning. This course is a component in the elementary and secondary teacher education programs' technology strand and is designated technology-intensive. Pre-requisite: Elementary education majors must be admitted to the teacher education program. Cross-listed with ED 318.

PSYC-320 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Provides students with knowledge of a representative sampling of topics and issues in social psychology plus an understanding of the methodology used by social psychologists. Covers the ways in which people or groups affect others and in turn are affected by them. Topics will include social perception, beliefs, attitudes, values, persuasion, interpersonal attraction, altruism, cooperation, competition, social power, group performance, conflict and resolution. Recommended pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-321 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Builds on knowledge gained in Developmental Psychology to further the understanding level of various learning, teaching, developmental theories and processes. Pre-requisite: PSYC 205 or acceptance into the Education Program. Cross-listed with ED 321.

PSYC-370 PEACE, CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE 3.00 Credits

Interdisciplinary introduction to the field of peace psychology with an emphasis on methods of nonviolent conflict resolution. A historical perspective of the causes of war and peace will be used to introduce the basic concepts and theories of peace psychology. Topics will include conflict resolution, negotiation and bargaining, nonviolence, political efficacy, political participation and activism. The content and applications of concepts will draw upon current national and international situations. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-375 ISSUES IN ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIPS 3.00 Credits

This class is a general introduction to the different issues in abusive relationships. Topics include domestic violence counseling, working with perpetrators as well as victims, recognizing abusive patterns, breaking the cycle of violence, and creating effective relationships. The class format is interactive.

PSYC-380 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 3.00 Credits

A study of learning theory and its principles, implications, and applications. Individual differences in learning are explored. Behavioral, information processing, and cognitive theories of learning are emphasized. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 .

PSYC-385 RESEARCH METHODS 3.00 Credits

Develops students' ability to design an empirical study within the ethical constraints of human research and to understand the results of research in professional journals. Specific research designs covered include archival research, experimental designs, naturalistic observation, participant observation, quasi-experimental designs, single subject designs, and survey research. Integrates (1) analytical and evaluative thinking, (2) descriptive, explanatory, and critical writing, and (3) basic knowledge of the theory and application of qualitative and quantitative research design. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with SS 385.

PSYC-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

PSYC-391 WORKSHOP IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

PSYC-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

PSYC-395 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

PSYC-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-3.00 Credits

Requires students to assist faculty in the conduct of research projects and other creative professional activities within the field of psychology. Students are expected to meet on a regular basis with the faculty member and to perform activities needed to bring the research or creative activity to a successful completion.

PSYC-402 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION/PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Understanding and application of psychology tests and measurements by applying the concepts of validity, reliability, norming, item analysis, and test interpretation in test construction and to the evaluation of standardized tests. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-405 ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Gives greater depth to several of the themes covered in PSYC 205 Developmental Psychology. The cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development of children and adults will be studied from a multicultural perspective. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-410 SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Application of the principles and methodologies of psychology to athletics. Topics include individual philosophies of sport, motivation, personality of coaches and athletes, recreational sports for children, psychological testing, training and learning principles, mind/body relationships, and the effects of anxiety, arousal, and relaxation on performance and current research in the field. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with KIN 410.

PSYC-414 THE PSYCHOLOGY OF NATURAL, ARTISTIC, AND MORAL BEAUTY 3.00 Credits

The purpose of the course is to help students understand the influence of Natural Beauty, Artistic Beauty (painting, music, and literally anything designed by a human), and Moral Beauty on human flourishing. The course is designed as a service-learning course, in collaboration with the Area Agency on Aging, which will assign students to learn about moral beauty from elders in our community. Pre-requisites: Completion of PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 and ENGL 102 with "C" or better, or permission of instructor.

PSYC-415 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Positive psychology is the scientific study of what goes right in life, from birth to death and at all the stops in between. It takes seriously as a subject matter those things that make life most worth living. The three pillars of positive psychology include a) positive subjective experiences (pleasures, happiness, joy, etc.), b) positive individual traits (character strengths and virtues), and c) positive institutions. The course will concentrate on learning to apply positive psychology methods in a service learning approach. The methods are appropriate for both clinical and non-clinical populations. Prerequisites: A 'C' or better in PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 and ENGL 102.

PSYC-419 PSYCHOLOGY OF SUSTAINABILITY 3.00 Credits

An introduction to ecological psychology with an emphasis on the psychology of sustainability. Course focus is upon how psychological worldviews and human behavior are major causes of our environmental problems; and how changing those worldviews and behaviors can help lead to individual and collective flourishing. The course is designed as a variation on a service learning approach in which individual students will design personal self-change projects, based on the science of sustainability psychology, that cause them to become better stewards of our natural resources. The importance of the beauty of the natural world will be suffused throughout the course. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 and ENGL 102 or ENG 109.

PSYC-440 COUNSELING THEORIES AND TECHNIQUES 4.00 Credits

Study and application of the theories and techniques of counseling as well as issues related to multiculturalism, gender, and diversity. Fee required. Recommended pre-requisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 311.

PSYC-442 ETHICAL PRINCIPLES IN COUNSELING 3.00 Credits

Topics covered include federal and state laws, client welfare as a primary concern, professional competence-supervision/development, financial issues, personal wellness, and relationships to professionals and institutions. Development of students' ability to conceptualize ethical issues, utilize an appropriate model for resolution, and appreciate personal values and modes of ethical problem-solving are also considered. Fee required. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 442.

PSYC-443 CASE MANAGEMENT AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY 3.00 Credits

The course focuses on practical application and administration of Case Management Services in health and human service delivery systems in Idaho. Case management studies emphasize clinical focus on case management services that apply to Rural and Frontier settings in Idaho. Students work with case management models where case management and records monitoring occur, from hospital, in-patient care to out patient settings in rural communities. Students are exposed to various treatment populations such as High Risk populations including AIDS/HIV populations, elderly, Native American, as well as gender specific issues. Students will be exposed to other disciplines such as Mental Health, Voc-Rehab. as well as Developmental Disability populations. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 443.

PSYC-444 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND PHARMACOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Introduction to basic concepts of drug absorption, distribution and effect. It is intended to provide substance abuse counselors with a broad background in the understanding of drug effects and operations. Additionally, to allow the student to have a base of knowledge of pharmacology upon which instruction and education of clients can be facilitated. Fulfills the requirement for certification for both Idaho and Washington State Certification Boards. Includes concepts of basic neuroanatomy, concepts of drug absorption and drug elimination, anatomy of drug effects, and consequences of long term drug use. A comprehensive survey of entities and agencies that govern Controlled Substances and ODT issues. A global perspective on the physiology and pharmacology of different classes of drugs both those illegal and legal, abused and those used for treatment in institutions. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101, PSYC 205, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 444.

PSYC-445 COUNSELING THE TEENAGER 3.00 Credits

Reviews personality theories, counseling strategies, communication skills, values clarification and perception in relationship to adolescent developmental tasks and coping skills. Examines social problem areas often associated with teenage populations and the implications that those situations present for the counselor. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-446 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND FAMILY SYSTEM 3.00 Credits

Includes behavioral patterns in dysfunctional family systems, intervention techniques and best practice model programs in dealing with family issues surrounding addiction problems. This course will expose the student to a plethora of various approaches to family systems and cultures that are diverse in nature. Students will create and experience sculpting, remodeling and replicating family roles and dysfunctional systems within a learning lab model. Students will study and become intimately acquainted with the roles of family dysfunction and codependency issues. Additionally, the student will review historical perspectives that help shape and steer the current modes of treatment for this underserved population within the addictions field. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 446.

PSYC-447 TREATING CODEPENDENCY AND ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS 3.00 Credits

Identifies patterns of family dysfunction and the roots of codependency. Identifies the impact of chemical dependency, physical and sexual abuse, and parental rigidity on the development of the personality. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 447.

PSYC-448 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY AND THE GROUP APPROACH 3.00 Credits

Identifies specific needs and treatment issues of the chemically dependent client. It is designed to provide both a cognitive and an experiential base from which the student can develop competency in treating this special population. Fulfills the requirements for certification as a chemical dependency counselor. Competency-based education models for learning and integration of skills and techniques will be utilized. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 448.

PSYC-449 ASSESMENT/SCREENING AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY COUNSELING 3.00 Credits

Reviews techniques for intake screening and assessment of chemical dependency clients. Appropriate for use in multiple settings. Field experience is included. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.. Cross-listed with ADS 449.

PSYC-450 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Human thinking and problem-solving will be covered in depth. In particular, students will learn about memory, abstraction and concreteness in thought, symbolic concepts and mental structures, mental operations, search strategies and problem solving. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-455 PSYCHOLOGY OF MOTIVATION 3.00 Credits

A study of various theoretical perspectives which psychologists have used to explain and predict the relationships between state/trait motivation and human behavior. Special emphasis is given to the development of strategies to positively affect motivation and models for self-motivation in applied settings. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-456 DRUGS IN SOCIETY 2.00 Credits

An overview of current drugs of choice and their impact on all age groups. Covers drug education relevant to today's society. Explores the history, use, physiology, behavior, dependency, treatment and prevention aspects of drugs. Students and guest speakers will share their knowledge on specific issues through presentations and discussions. Utilizes many instructional methods in the pursuit of a general understanding of the effects of drugs upon society. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with HLTH 456.

PSYC-457 DRUGS AND THE ATHLETE 1.00 Credit

Covers the social-psychological aspects of the use of alcohol and other drugs by athletes. Explores the trends of commonly abused drugs, the physiological effects of use, media influences and social norms towards use, and proactive programming for the educator/coach. Many instructional approaches will be utilized in the pursuit of an understanding of the phenomenon of athletes as drug-abusers. Cross-listed with HLTH 457.

PSYC-464 POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

In this course students will examine patterns of political behavior, including leadership, group behavior, voting, race, ethnicity, nationalism, political extremism, terrorism, war and genocide. Pre-requisite: POLS 101 or PSYC 101, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with POLS 464.

PSYC-470 CRISIS INTERVENTION 3.00 Credits

Introduction and comprehensive overview of crisis intervention. Basic principles and theory of crisis intervention will be presented. Gives a foundation toward developing the skills to effectively deal with others in a crisis situation. Included are special populations/topics such as war veterans, rape, adult survivors, national disasters and other topics. Pre-requisites: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ADS 470.

PSYC-475 HIV/AIDS CRITICAL ISSUES 3.00 Credits

An analysis of the medical, social, cultural and economics issues related to HIV/AIDS. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with HLTH 475.

PSYC-480 ISSUES OF ABUSE 3.00 Credits

Meets the State of Washington re-certification requirements. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or PSYC 205 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-485 ADVANCED RESEARCH SEMINAR 3.00 Credits

Provides experience in carrying out research projects in the social sciences, nursing and other disciplines. The emphasis will be on the active participation in seminar discussions to develop an understanding of the design and completion of all phases of selected research projects. Each student will design a study, obtain ethical approval, collect and analyze data and write a research report summarizing the results of their study. In addition, each student will assist other seminar members in selected aspects of their studies. Pre-requisite: PSYC 385 or permission of instructor.

PSYC-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

PSYC-491 WORKSHOP IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

PSYC-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

PSYC-494 INTERNSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-6.00 Credits

Emphasizes the development of basic helping skills through a supervised non-chemical dependency internship. Pre- or co-requisites: Criminal history background check, permission of the instructor, and PSYC 442. Graded P/F only.

PSYC-495 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

Emphasizes the development of the basic helping skills and/or psychological research skills through a supervised field experience. Learning plans and goals will be defined to target students desiring a specific field experience in various settings utilizing addictions professionals and programs. Pre-requisites: Permission of the instructor and PSYC 442. Cross-listed with ADS 495.

PSYC-499 RESEARCH PROJECT AND SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Provides a capstone experience that includes the conduct of psychological research designed by each student. A quantitative or qualitative research paper or project is required. Pre-requisites: PSYC 300 AND PSYC 385.

SOC-101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 3.00 Credits

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles and processes in sociology with materials relating to culture, social interaction, institutions and social change.

SOC-102 CURRENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3.00 Credits

Students develop a sociological frame of reference for understanding some of the complex problems of our society. Problems examined include poverty, environmental degradation, racism, sexism, crime, substance abuse, inadequate healthcare, etc. in the context of American society.

SOC-275 PRIN OF INTERVIEWING AND CASE STUDIES 3.00 Credits

Behavioral sciences theory as applied to interviewing and case studies is examined in this course in order to understand the effects of setting, interview stages, and levels of communication during the interviewing process.

SOC-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

Graded P/F only.

SOC-291 WORKSHOP IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

SOC-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

SOC-295 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-9.00 Credits

SOC-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

SOC-310 RELIGION IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY 3.00 Credits

Students study religion as a social phenomenon by examining the functions and organization of religions. The reciprocal relationship between religion and other social institutions is illuminated by historical examples and current trends in religion.

SOC-315 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY 3.00 Credits

A study of the institutions of marriage and the family in a cross-cultural perspective, and an analysis of the various factors and forces at work in our time which are affecting relationships within the family.

SOC-320 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3.00 Credits

Theories of causation, prevention, control, and treatment of delinquency in contemporary society are presented. Modes of treatment, methods of diverting youth-related problems from juvenile courts to other community resources are studied along with factors in post-treatment adjustment. Cross-listed with JS 320.

SOC-325 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION 3.00 Credits

Students study the major dimensions of social stratification systems, including class, prestige and power and how inequalities manifest themselves in everyday life. Pre-requisite: SOC 101.

SOC-333 WHITE COLLAR CRIME 3.00 Credits

The costs, causes, and control of crime by and against businesses and other organizations; the relationship between trust and white collar crime; and the impact of the media in shaping perceptions of white collar crime will be studied. Pre-requisites: JS 103 or SOC 101 or SOC 102 and ENGL 102 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with JS 333.

SOC-345 CRIMINOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Issues related to crime and society, theories of criminality, types and trends of crime, characteristics of offenders, social control, criminological controversies. Pre-requisite: SOC 101. Cross-listed with JS 345.

SOC-355 RURAL SOCIOLOGY 3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to some of the most pressing issues facing rural peoples and areas today. Students learn about the historical and contemporary relationships of rural peoples and regions to urban areas and the global economy and the impact of these relationships on the well being of rural people and their environments. Emerging forms of political, economic, and social organization in rural areas are examined in this context of the historical legacy. Prerequisites: SOC 101 or ENGL 102 or ENGL 109 or instructor permission.

SOC-360 RACE AND ETHNICITY 3.00 Credits

An introduction to the theoretical and substantive issues in the study of race and ethnicity. Students learn about the historical development of race and ethnicity as social categories and examine contemporary race and ethnic relations in the United States and other societies.

SOC-366 ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY 3.00 Credits

Provides students with an overview of some of the major currents of thought in environmental sociology. Topics covered include such ecologically relevant social processes as the production of food, the use of forests, the disposal of so-called waste, and energy use, to name a few. Particular attention is paid to the present era of human history and the political economic aspects of societies' relationships to the environment. By the end of class, students should be able to engage in discussions on the links between human societies and contemporary environmental problems in an informed and critical manner. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102.

SOC-375 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL CONTROL 3.00 Credits

Students study the origins and functions of deviant behaviors and social control to learn of their affect on maintaining and/or changing society. Pre-requisites: SOC 101 or 102 and Junior standing.

SOC-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

SOC-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

SOC-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

SOC-403 SOCIAL CHANGE 3.00 Credits

This course provides an analysis of the political economic, ecological, and ideological sources and consequences of social change. Students critically examine historical and contemporary processes of societal development and change and the impact of such processes on individuals, communities, and societies in global context. Pre-requisite: SOC 101.

SOC-422 RACE, CLASS, GENDER & JUSTICE 3.00 Credits

This course explores the effects of race, class and gender on the criminal justice system. Patterns of offending and victimization associated with the categories of race, class and gender will be studied. Students will study topics such as profiling, disparities in sentencing and the death penalty, minority overrepresentation in prison, responses to battering, and criminal justice system employment practices. Pre-requisite: JS 103 or SOC 101 or instructor permission. Cross-listed with JS 422.

SOC-425 VIOLENCE TOWARD WOMEN 3.00 Credits

This course will provide an overview of violence directed toward women. Crimes such as domestic violence, stalking, rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment will be analyzed within a broader social context. Special attention will be given to how these crimes affect women and men, and how societal institutions (e.g., the criminal justice system, the health care system, employers, and social service providers) may better address the needs of victims and offenders. The course will be based on information gathered through current research, guest lectures, and scholarly and media resources. Pre-requisite: ENGL 101 & ENGL 102. Cross-listed with JS 425.

SOC-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-3.00 Credits

SOC-491 WORKSHOP IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

SOC-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-12.00 Credits

SOC-495 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY 1.00-9.00 Credits

SS-150 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 3.00 Credits

The social sciences affect our everyday life through school, government, and business. This course introduces the student to this complex and influential field of knowledge and its uses. Students will investigate social problems of global concern, such as crime, population growth, human rights, and other concerns. Pre-requisite/co-requisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 109.

SS-184 DIVERSITY IN ORGANIZATIONS 3.00 Credits

This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation for the diversity that exists in contemporary American organizations. Students will explore historical and contemporary experiences from perspectives of both women and men of diverse races, ethnicities, social class, religions, sexual orientation, ages and abilities focusing on how those perspectives effect human relations in the workplace. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical consciousness and explore ways to eliminate negative stereotyping and discrimination that often leads to unequal treatment in organizations. Cross-listed with HRPT 184.

SS-185 HUMAN RELATIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS 3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course focusing on the complexities of human interaction within contemporary American organizations. The impact of organizational culture on group and individual behavior during conflict and change as well as leadership and self-management will be explored. Cross-listed with HRPT 185.

SS-190 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-192 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-193 SERVICE LEARNING 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-200 INTRODUCTION TO WOMENS STUDIES 3.00 Credits

Introduction to Women's Studies concentrates on understanding how women have both been shaped by and have shaped the world around them. By studying women's place and status in society, this course provides a critical lens through which to view the role of sex and gender in larger social forces through a variety of contexts. Pre-requisite: Any 100-level ANTH, HIST, POLS, SS or SOC course.

SS-284 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN SOC SCIENCES 3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to computer technology and its application to the Social Sciences. The course will be oriented towards research applications. Pre-requisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 109.

SS-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-291 WORKSHOP IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-295 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-300 STATISTICAL METHODS 3.00 Credits

Descriptive and inferential statistical concepts commonly used in the treatment of data in social science research are surveyed. The understanding of the concepts through application will be emphasized. Topics covered include: measures of central tendency, measures of variability, correlation methods, hypothesis testing, and simple analysis of variance. Pre-requisite: Core Math. Cross-listed with ECON 300, PSYC 300.

SS-350 ETHICS: 3.00 Credits

The primary purpose of the integrative 350 core course is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in ethical clarification with reference to at least two major contemporary issues. The courses focus principally on ethical concerns. Topics include the following subjects: ANIMALS AND SOCIETY This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the ethical dimensions of relationships between humans and non-human animals. Drawing on the works of philosophers, social scientists, and legal scholars, students will learn about the roles, moral standing, and treatment of animals in past and present societies. TERRORISM IN THE CONTEMPORARY ERA An interdisciplinary survey into the phenomena of political violence and terrorism is the core of this course. Historical, ethnic, religious, and ideological roots of terrorism are examined to put this behavior in sound, ethical perspectives with respect to the values of society and the goals of its perpetrators. WOMEN IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY The ethical issues confronted by American women are examined by study of literary and historical texts as well as through their own writing. Cross-listed with HUM 350. Pre-requisite: Completion of the skills component of the General Education Core or permission of the instructor.

SS-384 COMPUTERS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 3.00 Credits

This course will examine advanced topics in the practical and ethical implications of computers in our society, as well as advanced usage of computers in the disciplines of social sciences.

SS-385 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND STATISTICAL CONCEPTS 3.00 Credits

This interdisciplinary course is designed to develop each student's ability to understand the results of research presented in professional journals and to communicate the meaning of data, research findings, and statistical data to others. This course integrates 1) analytical and evaluative thinking; 2) descriptive, explanatory and critical writing; 3) basic knowledge of research design and statistical thinking; and 4) data interpretation in simulated settings. Cross-listed with PSYC 385.

SS-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-491 WORKSHOP IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 1.00-3.00 Credits

SS-494 INTERNSHIP IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-495 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 1.00-12.00 Credits

SS-498 CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURES 3.00 Credits

Study and examination of Native Americans and situations facing their people in contemporary America.

SS-499 RESEARCH PROJECT AND SEMINAR IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 3.00 Credits

In this course, students will use the skills and knowledge they have developed during their undergraduate tenure to design and complete a research project in their Social Science disciplinary emphasis. The final products will be a scholarly paper and a public presentation detailing the students' work. Pre-requisite: POLS/PHIL 200, and HIST 200 or SS 385; and permission of instructor.

SW-140 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE 3.00 Credits

The focus of this course is to help social work and non-social work majors gain an understanding of the professional foundation of social work. Students will be introduced to the knowledge, skills, and ethics involved in the generalist social work practice. Attention is given to the many settings and roles in which social workers work with diverse client groups whom social workers service. Volunteer service learning project is required. This course is required for all social work majors.

SW-193 SERVICE LEARNING 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-226 BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR 3.00 Credits

Introduces students to a field of neuroscience that is variously referred to as physiological psychology, biopsychology, behavioral biology, or behavioral neuroscience. Main focus is on gaining and/or demonstrating an understanding of relationships between central nervous system processes and human behavior. Cross-listed with PSYC-226. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101; and ENGL 102 or ENGL 109.

SW-241 SOCIAL WORK GENERALIST PRACTICE 3.00 Credits

Provides an introduction to, and overview of, practice skills, methods, and problem solving processes necessary to generalist social work practice with diverse populations. The course consists of lecture, laboratory components to facilitate integration of values, ethics, knowledge and skills base in work with individuals, groups, organizations and communities. Pre/Co-requisite: SW 140 or permission of instructor.

SW-290 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-291 WORKSHOP IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-3.00 Credits

SW-292 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-293 SERVICE LEARNING 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-295 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-299 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-315 WORKING WITH GRIEF AND LOSS 3.00 Credits

By equipping the professional social worker with the ability to recognize and address the client's grief and loss issues, the social work change process can continue to enable the client to focus on increased social functioning which is not hampered by unresolved issues. While death and dying are a significant factor in grief and loss, this course is predominately focused on other causes of loss and grief. The rationale of the course, therefore, is based upon the recognition of the many causes of sanctioned, unsanctioned, and unrecognized grief over losses which occur in ordinary living.

SW-320 HISTORY OF SOCIAL WELFARE IN THE US 3.00 Credits

This course presents a historical review of the development of social welfare in this country from colonial times to the present. Within that context, social welfare is explored relative to economic, political, social, religious, and philosophical developments. This course examines this country's responses to social welfare concerns through pragmatic efforts involving both social treatment and social control. The approach is topical and selective, rather than strictly chronological and comprehensive. Cross-listed with HIST 320.

SW-321 HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I 3.00 Credits

This course builds upon the biological, behavioral and social sciences of the Liberal Arts core. It adds a social systems perspective to explore the determinants of human behavior in infancy, childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Class, ethnicity, race, and gender are emphasized, while family, group, organization, community and society provide the person/environment transactional context. This course introduces the major psychological, sociological and social work theories which underpin social work practice. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or instructor's permission.

SW-322 HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II 3.00 Credits

This course is the second of two human behavior courses, which deal with research, theories, and concepts on individual and family development from an ecological perspective. This course builds upon the knowledge base from the Liberal Arts core in biology, psychology, political science, economics, sociology, and anthropology. Pre-requisite: SW 321.

SW-325 THE LAW OF CHILD AND FAMILY 3.00 Credits

This course examines legal principles and procedures of special relevance to the practice of social work and work within human service agencies. The course will review the basic structure and operation of the American legal system; basic principles of legal research; basic principles of constitutional law; legislative process; courtroom testimony; and legal principles related to juvenile justice, adult and child protection, adoption, education, domestic relations, mental health, aging, education, medic-legal issues, and disabilities.

SW-330 MENTAL HEALTH AND MENTAL ILLNESS IN THE 21ST CENTURY 3.00 Credits

Mental Health and Mental Illness in the 21st Century is designed to enable students to construct their own meaning and understanding of the terms "mental illness" through a series of learning activities. These activities include assigned readings, the media, discussions, and interaction with mental health consumers, family members, service providers, and service learning. Students will be introduced to three approaches to treatment: the medical model, the psychosocial rehabilitation model, and the recovery model. Students will become familiar with treatment modalities including therapeutic communities, clubhouses, and programs based on the strengths perspective. Pre-requisite: PSYC 101 or permission of instructor.

SW-340 SOCIAL POLICY 3.00 Credits

This course explores the development, formulation, implementation and effects of social policy on institutions and society. Social policy formation, decision-making, analysis, and their intentional and unintentional effects on society are examined through the utilization of both historic and scientific public policy critical thinking analysis. Issues of identifying, evaluating, and reporting those effects are presented and discussed. A preview of present and future trends will be introduced and critically analyzed.

SW-341 GENERALIST PRACTICE IN MICROINTERVENTIONS 3.00 Credits

Students focus on generalist practice with individuals and families in a variety of familial, organizational and cultural contexts. The course builds upon the beginning generalist social work skills learned in SW 241. Emphases are on development of the problem-solving approach, evaluation of practice effectiveness and assessment and intervention techniques within the context of generalist practice. Values, techniques, theory, ethics, research and diversity are stressed. Course enrollment is limited to Social Work majors. Pre-requisite: SW 241.

SW-342 GENERALIST PRACTICE IN MEZZO-INTERVENTIONS 3.00 Credits

Building upon previous practice classes, this course explores the theories and dynamics of group behavior, and the techniques of working with and within diverse groups in a variety of community and organizational contexts. Students learn to assess interaction patterns, individual change through group processes, ethical options and their own group skills as an emphasis within generalist practice. Course enrollment is limited to Social Work majors. Pre-requisite: SW 341.

SW-360 CASE MANAGEMENT IN SOCIAL WORK 3.00 Credits

This course is designed to give social work students skills in managing their cases as they enter the field of social work practice. These skills will include engagement, assessment, service plan development, referrals, client monitoring, evaluation, and termination. Students will also learn to manage client data with popular software programs, such as Excel.

SW-361 CHILD WELFARE 3.00 Credits

This course presents to the social work student a fundamental model of social work practice that addresses a multi-systemic approach to intervention for families that emphasizes safety, permanence and well-being. The class explores best practice methods of intervention with diverse populations that are a blend of policy changes and practice applications in the domain of child welfare practices.

SW-362 ADVOCACY FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE 3.00 Credits

The focus of this course is to help students gain an understanding of the generalist practice framework for social work advocacy for social justice. Students will explore the rich and diverse history of social work advocacy, the generalist practice framework for social work advocacy for social justice, representation, influence, contexts, and social work advocacy practice skills. Students will be introduced to the knowledge, strategies, and skills needed to advocate at the micro, mezzo, and macro level of social work practice. An emphasis on client advocacy, cause advocacy, legislative advocacy, and administrative advocacy are presented.

SW-363 ETHICS IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 3.00 Credits

The focus of this course is to familiarize the student with the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and for students to develop and ability to apply these codes to a variety of specific problem situations. Students will explore current professional, ethical, and legal issues in a variety of settings and learn how to think through ethical issues in a systematic manner. Principles of ethical decision making and decision-making strategies will be explored. Pre-requisite: Junior standing.

SW-364 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS 3.00 Credits

This Social Work elective course focuses on Social Work practice with children, adolescents, and their families. The course incorporates social work practice theory and skill development, relevant policy issues and the considerations, and emphasizes the ways in which empirical research informs practice.

SW-365 AGING IN THE 21ST CENTURY 3.00 Credits

As the American population ages, millions of people referred to as "baby boomers" have begun to retire. However, unlike any time in our history, that population will not be like the stereotypes of old people sitting quietly in rocking chairs. In fact, they will be a population to be reckoned with as they make increasing economic, political, and social demands and will expect to have those demands addressed. The purpose of this course is to create an holistic and positive understanding of older people and how they expect to live in the 21st Century. Their physical, psychological, social, philosophical, ethical, and spiritual dimensions will be infused into on-line discussions and class assignments.

SW-366 SOCIAL WORK AND SPIRITUAL DIVERSITY 3.00 Credits

This is an elective course offered to students in the Social Work program with the purpose of understanding the role of spirituality and religion within the context of social work's commitment to the person-in-environment perspective and individual diversity. Religion and spirituality have a profound influence on the lives of clients seen by social work practitioners as well as on social workers themselves. This course considers the role of religion and spirituality in the socialization process of the professional and the client. It examines religious values, ethics, principles, and philosophies as influences.

SW-367 WORKING W/CLIENTS ON PSYCHOTROPIC MEDS 3.00 Credits

This course will focus on providing services to clients being treated with psychotropic medication and their families. Course content includes the nature of psychotropic medication in the treatment of mental illness, behavioral disorders, and substance abuse. Legal and ethical issues and alternative treatments will also be presented. Pre/Co-requisite: PSYC 311 or permission of the instructor.

SW-386 RESEARCH METHODS 3.00 Credits

This course introduces the theory and application of basic social scientific research techniques, including qualitative and quantitative methods, data collection, statistical thinking, assessment and single-subject design. The use of research as one tool in the professional repertoire of skills available to the social work generalist and evaluation of practice are emphasized. The ethics of scientific inquiry is stressed throughout. Course enrollment is limited to Social Work majors. Pre-requisite: Core Math course.

SW-390 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-3.00 Credits

SW-392 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-393 SERVICE LEARNING 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-394 INTERNSHIP IN SOCIAL WORK 12.00 Credits

SW-395 PRACTICUM IN SOCIAL WORK 12.00 Credits

SW-399 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-3.00 Credits

SW-400 CASE MANAGEMENT IN SOCIAL WORK 3.00 Credits

This social work program elective is designed to give social work students skills in managing their cases as they enter the field of social work practice. These skills will include engagement, assessment, service plan development, referral, monitoring clients, and termination. In addition, students in this course will learn to use spreadsheet and database programs to manage data on their clients. Students will demonstrate their skills through weekly discussions and exercises.

SW-401 VIOLENCE AND THE FAMILY 3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the causes, prevalence, treatment and prevention of violence that individuals may encounter when working with families. It provides a historical approach to the issue of violence, the various frameworks to understand it, and the domestic trends that both promote and hinder it. The course will maintain a dual focus on victims and perpetrators of crime, and how they interact with social and economic justice issues. The course will explore the impact of violence on vulnerable groups such as children, women, elderly, mentally ill, minority groups, and others special populations. Topics include child maltreatment, domestic violence, courtship violence, school violence, gang violence, workplace violence, abuse of elderly and disabled, hate crimes, and more. The course will help students to develop a culturally competent view of the impact of violence upon individuals, families and the society at large. Students will learn about violence prevention and intervention strategies that may be used in practice, programming, policy, and research.

SW-402 SOCIAL WORK WITH FAMILIES 3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the family as the client system. For generalist practice social workers who will have the need to serve families as a unit, this course will help students to gain a firm understanding of the family as a system. In addition students will understand the roles, functions, communication patterns, and relational patterns that can be center of family problems as well as resources for better functioning. This course will also emphasize the strengths perspective in helping families make changes that will allow them to cope with issues impeding their functioning. Ethical issues that arise in work with families will also be addressed. Finally, all issues will be referenced through a cultural lens.

SW-442 GENERALIST PRACTICE IN MEZZO-INTERVENTIONS 3.00 Credits

Building upon previous practice classes, this course explores the theories and dynamics of group behavior, and the techniques of working with and within diverse groups in a variety of community and organizational contexts. Students learn to assess interaction patterns, individual change through group processes, ethical options and their own group skills as an emphasis within generalist practice. Course enrollment is limited to Social Work majors. Pre-requisite: SW 341 and admission to social work program.

SW-443 GENERAL PRACTICE IN MACRO-INTERVENTIONS 3.00 Credits

The Generalist Approach is continued with emphasis on social work practice with and within organizations and communities. Emphasis is place on the importance of the many systems affecting large numbers of individuals. Organizational and community structures are examined in order for the beginning practitioner to understand and intervene in the agencies and community within the social service delivery system. Course enrollment is limited to social work majors. Pre-requisite: SW 341 and admission to the social work program.

SW-480 DIVERSITY AWARENESS IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 3.00 Credits

This course synthesizes knowledge, values, and skills regarding diverse experiences among client systems, allowing students to demonstrate their understanding of the effects of diverse characteristics in shaping personal identity and the human experience. The course focuses on the intersectionality of multiple factors of age, class, color, culture, physical and mental ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology, race, spirituality, sex, and sexual orientation. The course will address the consequences of human differences that may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation, as well as privilege and power. Pre-requisite: SW497A, concurrent with SW497B or permission of the instructor.

SW-490 DIRECTED STUDY IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-3.00 Credits

SW-491 WORKSHOP IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-3.00 Credits

SW-492 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-493 SERVICE LEARNING 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-497A FIELD INSTRUCTION I 4.00 Credits

Guided by a learning contract, Field Instruction I is a supervised learning experience enabling the student to apply learned techniques, theories, and professional values from social work foundation courses to an agency setting. Field Instruction I focuses on supervised social work practice in a human service agency. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the BSW Program. Graded P/F only. Pre-requisite: SW 386, SW 342. SW 443 can be taken concurrently.

SW-497B FIELD INSTRUCTION II 4.00 Credits

Guided by a learning contract, Field Instruction II is a supervised learning experience enabling the student to apply learned techniques, theories, and values from social work foundation courses to an agency setting. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the BSW Program. Graded P/F only. Pre-requisite: SW 497A.

SW-498A SENIOR SEMINAR I 2.00 Credits

This course focuses on classroom learning. The class facilitates the student's professional development toward entry level generalist practice by providing a forum for the integration of field experiences with classroom learning of social work knowledge, skills, and values. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the BSW Program and who have fulfilled the requirements outlined in the Field Application. Pre-requisite: SW 386 and SW 442. SW 443 can be taken concurrently. Co-Requisite: SW 497A.

SW-498B SENIOR SEMINAR II 2.00 Credits

Senior Seminar II, building on the learning in Senior Seminar I, focuses on classroom learning. The class facilitates the student's professional devlopment toward entry level generalist practice by providing a forum for the integration of field experiences with classroom learning of social work knowledge, values, and skills. Pre-requisite: SW 497A and SW 498A. Co-requisite: SW 497B.

SW-499 RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 1.00-12.00 Credits

SW-499A SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT AND DESIGN 3.00 Credits

This course is designed to facilitate the completion of a senior research project, required of all students who are in Field Practicum. In this course, students utilize the knowledge and skills acquired in SW 386 to develop their research project. The course involves a review of research methodologies and statistical procedures relevant to the student's investigation. The student is required to complete the project literature review and, if applicable, any IRB applications during this course. The study itself is to be completed in SW 499B, Research Seminar. Pre-requisite: SW 386. Co-requisite: SW 495A.

SW-499B SENIOR RESEARCH PROJECT SEMINAR 3.00 Credits

This is the second course in a series designed to guide students through the process of completing the research project they proposed and began in SW 499A. The final product that students will complete is a paper that explains their work and results. If the research project directly involves human subjects, the proposal must be approved by the Human Subjects Review Committee before it is undertaken. This final paper must include the Introduction, Literature Review, Research Concerns, Methodology, Findings, and Discussion and Implication. It will also be APA formatting throughout. The final requirement of the research project is a power point presentation. This presentation will be professionally made to a group of faculty and students. Pre-requisite: SW 499A. Co-requisite: SW 495B.

Allison, Kerensa L, PhD, Assistant Professor

Canfield, Amy E, PhD, Associate Professor

Diessner, Rhett, EdD, Professor

Downey, Eleanor, PhD, Professor

Earles, Laura, PhD, Associate Professor

FitzSimmons, Kelly, Assistant Professor

Genthos, Rachelle, PhD, Assistant Professor

Graves, Darci, MSW, Assistant Professor

Hoffmann, Leif S, PhD, Assistant Professor

Martin, Eric L, PhD, Professor

McMillin, Heidee E, PhD, Associate Professor

Moua, Manee, Assistant Professor

Nichols, Lauren, MSW, Instructor

Reed, Gary E, PhD, Professor

Renner, Tiffany A, MSW, Assistant Professor

Riggs, Christopher K, PhD, Professor/Division Chair

Rosenbaum, LaChelle, PhD, Instructor/Director of Social Work

Rust, Teri, PhD, Professor

St. Louis, Judith, PhD, Assistant Professor

Straughan, Gene, PhD, Professor

VanLanen, Amanda, PhD, Assistant Professor

Wartel, Angela R, MPA, Instructor

White, Marta, MSW, Assistant Professor